The music playing is the new Gallipoli March by the Royal Marines Band written for 100th Anniversary of Gallipoli

By Martin Ellerby and conducted by Capt Andrew Gregory RM
The full programme recorded in Bury Parish Church 25th April 2015 is on Sale in the Fusilier Museum Bury
Cost £10
ring 0161 763 8950 for a copy


1st Battalion at Gallipoli

Letter home



Pte Alfred Gillibrand, Lancashire Fusiliers

My Grandfather Alfred Gillibrand who served in the Lancashire Fusiliers wrote a letter that was published in the national press while he was recovering from his wounds at the Dardanelles, i've attached a copy which may be of use to you.

My Grandfather survived the war and lived until a ripe old age in Darwen Lancashire.

 

Taken from the Gallipoli web site
http://www.gallipoli-association.org/






A letter straight from W Beach 7 days after the Lancashire Landing

Written By Captain A D Talbot KIA 4th June 1915

On Board the Cunard S.S. “Alaunia”

2-5-15

Dear Wang,
I sent you a line yesterday via a wounded officer who was going to post it at the base, but as this boat is the out of mail headquarters (sic) I drop a line again as I can censor it myself.
I got through the landing without a scratch thanks to my natural instinct to seek cover on a flat beach, but sprained my ankle badly the second night falling in a trench in the dark. By Jove it was pretty hot that first Sunday morning. I can hardly write about it yet.
Poor old Porter was killed by a hand grenade I think climbing up the cliff on my right. I am awfully sick he got knocked over. Tom Maunsell ( Captain Thomas Boyer Lane Maunsell Killed in action..Joe..Editor ) and Tommy were shot getting out of the boat. Clark was shot through the head sitting in the boat. I tell you I looked pretty slippy about getting ashore. I jumped overboard in 5 feet of water. I don’t think the men realised how hot the fire was they were laughing and joking to the last. Of course we were under HOB ( Major H O Bishop mentioned in Dispatches, just taken over the Bn as CO from Lt Col H V S Ormond...Joe..Editor ) as “Screams” had been sacked previously. Bishop is old guard and as cool as a cucumber under fire. Well I think we fairly made a name for ourselves as we were first to establish a hold on the peninsular. I only got about five men ashore alive in my boat and not one of them could use their rifles owning to sand jamming the bolt. (Sealham / Seckham?) did well all day. I believe he has since been hit through the shoulder. ( Captain L B L Seckham MC and Bar--Joe--Editor)
The sniping is simply awful here and one is as likely to get a bullet in the back as in the front, they hide all over the place. I don’t think for the first 24 hours there was a single second when you could not hear a bullet overhead hardly. I must say I think this kind of fighting is a bit too warm for words. I had two horse gunner signallers who were with L battery in France with me and they said they (had) never seen anything like that first landing.
We spent the night on HMS Euryalus and landed in boats in tows early at daylight. I can tell you the sight of the peninsular being shelled by the fleet was grand with the sun shining above it all. We kicked off right outside the supporting ships and went in fairly fast until we were right under the canons mouth the noise of the 10" etc. were deafening.
We never got a shot fired at us till the oars were tossed and then they started in earnest. The first bullet that struck the water brought up loud jeers from our men but poor devils they little thought what they were in for. (Brockhouse?) the runner was in my boat, he has a charmed life as he left his rifle on board and ran back for it and never got touched. C.S. Wilson was shot the first man I saw hit he got out first from the boat next me and was hit in the stomach at once. I didn’t need to remember Kipling’s words to stop me from looking twice at him. Gars was hit through the head above his eyes I hope he won’t lose his eyesight and Meakins had his arm badly shattered. I am afraid he will have lost it. (Kealy?) had his arm broken.
I don’t know how much I am allowed to tell you of all this but by the time you get this you will most likely know all the casualties. I must say I am sorry for the girls in Nuneaton if they really cared; but it will show that (toast of the south?) what a soldier does have to go through. Well I expect to be back in the firing line in a day or so but my foot is still bruised an although I feel an awful scrimshanker on the ship when I can see the battle going on on land I know if I go too soon my foot will go again. I could not move my toes for the first day and Price? thought it was broken. Well best luck old chap. I am glad you are not here for Mrs. Wang’s sake, do try and cheer my poor girl up, I am afraid when she finds out what the fighting is like out here it will make her feel rather sick. Well so far you haven’t got the doglegs (text certain at this point, meaning obscure!) and it won’t be my fault if you ever do.
Ever yours,
Oddy


Notes:
C.S. Wilson who was hit in the stomach was Company Serjeant Major William George Wilson. He died that day, he is commemorated on the Helles Memorial Panel 58 to 72 or 218 to 219.
Despite his early optimism, Talbot himself was killed in further fighting on 4th June 1915. His grave is at Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Reference E. 63.
Slingsby survived the War, by 1917 he had his M.C. In 1932 he became C.O. of one of the regiment’s battalions.

The names of 20 Lancashire Fusiliers Officers Killed at Gallipoli
and buried in the Lancashire Landing Cemetery




50th Anniversary Gallipoli Survivors reunion Dinner
25th April 1965


Click on Photo to enlarge
The attached photograph is of the 50th Anniversary reunion Dinner of the survivors of the “Lancashire Landing”. My grandfather is Private 2020 Harry Cavanagh (pictured 1st left on the front row) who enlisted 12.02.1910 and was discharged on 27.08.1915 after losing his leg at Gallipoli.
sent in by
Mark Cavanagh
grandson of Harry Cavanagh

'Lancashire Landing'

At dawn on 25 April 1st Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, part of the British 29th Division landed on W Beach, to the west of Cape Helles the southernmost tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. The Turks waited until the Fusiliers were almost ashore then opened fire.

Despite heavy losses the Fusiliers kept a toehold on the beach and eventually advanced up both sides
of the cliff driving the defending Turks out of their trenches.
Later that morning other units were diverted to W Beach to reinforce the troops who were
advancing on their inland objectives.

Six VCs were eventually awarded for this action and W Beach was renamed
Lancashire Landing in honour of the Battalion that had captured it.





Sale 5012 Lot 527 Sergeant Alfred Richards VC

The Gallipoli 'Lancashire Landing' Victoria Cross Group of Seven to Sergeant A. Richards, 1 Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers,
one of the famous 'Six Before Breakfast'
(a) Victoria Cross, reverse of suspension bar engraved 'Sergt A. Richards, 1st Bn Lancashire Fusrs', reverse of Cross engraved
'25 April 1916', the arms of the cross additionally engraved 'Sergt A Richards 1 Battn Lancs Fusrs'
(b) 1914-15 Star (1293 Sjt. A. Richards. Lan. Fus.)
(c) British War and Victory Medals (1293 Sjt.A. Richards. Lan. Fus.)
(d) 1939-45 Defence Medal
(e) Coronation 1937
(f) Army Long Service & G.C., G.V.R. (1293 Sjt: A.Richards. V.C. Lanc: Fus, the group good very fine
(g) A Silver Cigarette case (Hallmarks for Birmingham 1914), the outside cover engraved
'Presented as a Token of Esteemed Regard to Sergt. Alfred Richards V.C. 1st Batn Lancs Fus
from the Sergts 7th (R) Batn Lancs. Fus. 3rd June. 1916.'
(h) Box for 1939-45 Defence Medal addressed to Mr A Richards, Southfields, Wandsworth
(i) A quantity of original documents, including Certificate of Discharge 1906 and Character on Discharge 1907,
Certificate of Discharge from Second Enlistment 1915, 'Small Book' , various Certificates of Attainment, etc. (7)
Estimate ? 130,000-150,000

Sergeant Alfred Joseph Richards V.C. born 25.8.1880 in Plymouth, Devon, the son of Charles N. Richards,
late Colour Sergeant, 2nd Battalion, 20th Lancashire Fusiliers; educated at St Dominic's Priory School, Newcastle-upon-Tyne;
giving his trade as 'musician', he enlisted in the Lancashire Fusiliers as a bandboy at Newcastle 4.7.1895,
and served in Ireland with the 1st Battalion, where he was appointed full drummer; served in Crete, 1899,
and promoted to Lance Corporal; served in Malta, Gibraltar and Egypt, returning to England in 1907;
after two months in civilian life Richards re-enlisted, and rejoined his old Battalion in India; in 1915
the Battalion embarked for the Dardanelles, destined to take part in the greatest amphibious
operation carried out during the course of the Great War. As the spearhead of 86 Fusilier Brigade,
the Lancashire Fusiliers were to seize a small sandy cove lying between Cape Helles and Tekke Burnu.
The cove, named 'W Beach', was well defended, the Official History stating 'So strong were the defences
that even though the garrison was but one company (3rd/26th Regt.) of infantry, the Turks may well have
considered them impregnable to an attack from open boats'. The attack was timed for 6.00 a.m. on 25 April 1915.
Any element of surprise was sacrificed in favour of a naval bombardment of the enemy positions.
The landing was to become famous as 'The Lancashire Landing.'

V.C. London Gazette 24.08.1915 'Richard Raymond Willis, Capt.; Alfred Richards, No. 1293, Sergt.,
William Keneally, No. 1809, Private, 1st Battn. The Lancashire Fusiliers. Date of Acts of Bravery: 25 April 1915.
On the 25th of April 1915, three Companies and the Headquarters of the 1st Battn. Lancashire Fusiliers,
in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the west of Cape Helles, were met by very deadly fire
from hidden machine guns which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up
to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and
after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained.
Amongst the very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking,
Capt. Willis, Sergt. Richards and Private Keneally have been selected by their comrades
as having performed the most signal acts of bravery and devotion to duty.'

Captain Clayton, who was killed six weeks later, wrote: "There was tremendously strong barbed wire where
my boat was landed. Men were being hit in the boats and as they splashed ashore. I got up to my waist in water,
tripped over a rock and went under, got up and made for the shore and lay down by the barbed wire.
There was a man there before me shouting for wire-cutters. I got mine out, but could not make the slightest impression.
The front of the wire by now was a thick mass of men, the majority of whom never moved again?.
The noise was ghastly and the sights horrible. I eventually crawled through the wire with great difficulty,
as my pack kept catching on the wire, and got under a small mound which actually gave us protection.
The weight of our packs tired us, so that we could only gasp for breath. After a little time we fixed bayonets
and started up the cliffs right and left. On the right several were blown up by a mine (It was in fact a British naval shell.)
When we started up the cliff the enemy went, but when we got to the top they were ready and poured shots on us."

Major Shaw, who also did not survive the campaign, wrote: "About 100 yards from the beach the enemy opened fire,
and bullets came thick all around, splashing up the water. I didn't see anyone actually hit in the boats, though several were;
e.g. my Quartermaster-Sergeant and Sergeant-Major sitting next to me; but we were so jammed together that you
couldn't have moved, so that they must have been sitting there, dead. As soon as I felt the boat touch,
I dashed over the side into three feet of water and rushed for the barbed wire entanglements on the beach;
it must have been only three feet high or so, because I got over it amidst a perfect storm of lead and made for cover,
sand dunes on the other side, and got good cover. I then found Maunsell and only two men had followed me.
On the right of me on the cliff was a line of Turks in a trench taking pot shots at us, ditto on the left. I looked back.
There was one soldier between me and the wire, and a whole line in a row on the edge of the sands.
The sea behind was absolutely crimson, and you could hear the groans through the rattle of musketry.
A few were firing. I signaled to them to advance. I shouted to the soldier behind me to signal, but he shouted back
'I am shot through the chest'. I then perceived they were all hit."

Captain Willis, who led C Company into the attack, later recalled 'Not a sign of life was to be seen on the
Peninsula in front of us. It might have been a deserted land we were nearing in our little boats.
Then crack! The stroke oar of my boat fell forward, to the angry astonishment of his mates.
The signal for the massacre had been given; rapid fire, machine guns and deadly accurate sniping opened from the cliffs above,
and soon the casualties included the rest of the crew and many men.

The timing of the ambush was perfect; we were completely exposed and helpless in our slow moving boats,
just target practice for the concealed Turks, and within a few minutes only half of the thirty men in my boat were left alive.
We were now 100 yards from the shore, and I gave the order 'Overboard'. We scrambled out into some four feet of water
and some of the boats with their cargo of dead and wounded floated away on the currents still under fire from the snipers.
With this unpromising start the advance began. Many were hit in the sea, and no response was possible,
for the enemy was in trenches well above our heads.

We toiled through the water towards the sandy beach, but here another trap was awaiting us, for the Turks had cunningly
concealed a trip wire just below the surface of the water and on the beach itself were a number of land mines,
and a deep belt of rusty wire extended across the landing place. Machine-guns, hidden in caves at the
end of the amphitheatre of cliffs enfiladed this.

Our wretched men were ordered to wait behind this wire for the wire-cutters to cut a pathway through.
They were shot in helpless batches while they waited, and could not even use their rifles in retaliation since the sand
and the sea had clogged their action. One Turkish sniper in particular took a heavy toll at very close range
until I forced open the bolt of a rifle with the heel of my boot and closed his career with the first shot,
but the heap of empty cartridges round him testified to the damage he had done.

Safety lay in movement, and isolated parties scrambled through the wire to cover. Among them was
Sergeant Richards with a leg horribly twisted, but he managed somehow to get through.'

The Lancashire Fusiliers had started the day with 27 Officers and 1,002 other ranks.
The next morning they numbered 16 Officers and 304 men.

Richards was evacuated first to Egypt, where surgeons amputated his right leg above the knee, then home to England.
He was discharged 31.7.1915, after 26 years with the colours. His discharge papers read 'no longer fit for war service
(but fit for civil employment)'.

At the time of the award of his Victoria Cross Richards was living alone at the Princess Christian Soldiers' and Sailors' Home
in Woking. He had no family in England, and the newspapers referred to him as 'The Lonely V.C.'
In September 1916 he married Miss Dora Coombes, who had nursed him during his period of convalescence in Woking.
Despite his disability he remained an active member of the Regimental Old Comrades Association and even joined the
Home Guard during the Second World War, serving as Provost Sergeant, 28 County of London Battalion.
He died at the age of 73 in Southfields, London, in 1953, and is buried in Putney Vale Cemetery.

Joe
Omnia Audax XXth

 

Capt. Richard Raymond Willis

Richard Raymond Willis was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry
in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 38 years old, and a Captain in the 1st Bn., The Lancashire Fusiliers, British Army
during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 25 April 1915 west of Cape Helles, Gallipoli, Turkey, three companies and the Headquarters of the
1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, when landing on W Beach, were met by a very deadly fire from
hidden machine-guns which caused a large number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up and cut the wire
entanglements notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy and after overcoming supreme difficulties,
the cliffs were gained and the position maintained.

Captain Willis was one of the six members of the regiment elected for the award, the others being
Cuthbert Bromley, John Elisha Grimshaw, William Keneally, Alfred Joseph Richards
and Frank Edward Stubbs. Willis later achieved the rank of Major

Cheltenham Borough Cemetery
Crematorium Chapel


Commemorative plaques in the chapel cloisters

The commemorative plaque to Major Richard Willis, VC, 1st Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, who died in Cheltenham on 9th February 1966.
He was awarded the Victoria Cross for outstanding bravery on 25th April 1915 at the landing at Cape Helles,
Gallipoli. Full details of the award can be viewed here.

He is not a native Cheltonian being born in Woking in 1876.

This is the newspaper clipping Griff brought to Blackpool for me.
You will see that it refers to"The Royal lancashire Fusiliers" but there is nothing we can do about it
(we have informed the newspaper of their error !)


Maj Richard Raymond Willis VC 1st Bn Lancashire Fusiliers

Victoria Cross, Queen's Sudan Medal (1896-98), 14-15 Star, BWM, VM + MID(missing in the photo), Delhi Dunbar Medal (1911), KG VI 1937 Coronation Medal, QE II 1953 Coronation Medal, Khedives Sudan Medal (1896-1908) + clap: "Khartoum"

 

William Keneally V.C.

Birth: Dec. 26, 1886
Death: Jun. 29, 1915

World War I Victoria Cross Recipient. Keneally was born in Wexford, County Wexford, Ireland, where his father was a colour sergeant in the Royal Irish Regiment. When his father’s military service ended, the family moved to Wigan, Lancashire, England, but not before surviving the sinking of the SS Slavonia in the Azores in June of 1909. Keneally started working in the Lancashire mines at age 13 as a pit boy, playing football as a star member of the local team in his off hours, but after ten years in the pits he decided on a military career, enlisting in the 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers in 1909 for a seven-year hitch. Keneally was awarded the V.C. for action during the landings at W Beach during the Gallipoli Campaign, April 25, 1915, one of the group known in the press as "The Six V.C.s Before Breakfast" (the others were Capts. R.R. Willis and C. Bromley, Sgts. A. Richards and F.E. Stubbs, and L/Cpl. J.E. Grimshaw). Lance-Corporal Keneally’s company was being held up at a barrier of unbroken wire, a problem exacerbated by faulty maps, when he decided to deal with the situation on his own. (He had already done great service as a runner, delivering messages between positions under heavy enemy fire.) He belly-crawled to the obstructed wire and tried to cut it; though he was ultimately unsuccessful, he managed to return unscathed. Keneally’s V.C. was announced at the same time as Capt. Willis and Serjt. Richards: “On 25th April, 1915, three companies and the Headquarters of the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by a very deadly fire from hidden machine guns which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained. Amongst the many very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Capt. Willis, Serjt. Richards, and Pte. Keneally have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most signal acts of bravery and devotion to duty." Keneally survived the three Battles of Krithia during the Gallipoli Campaign, but was mortally wounded in the Battle for Gully Ravine on June 28, 1915, and died the next day. His V.C. medal is on loan to the Lancashire Fusiliers Museum, Bury.


Corp John Elisha Grimshaw V.C.

Birth: Jan. 23, 1893
Death: Jul. 20, 1980

World War I Victoria Cross Recipient. Grimshaw was born in the village of Abram, near Wigan in Lancashire. He worked as a carpenter in a colliery like his father until enlisting in the Lancashire Fusiliers in 1912. Grimshaw was awarded the V.C. for action during the landings at W Beach during the Gallipoli Campaign, April 25, 1915, one of the group known in the press as “The Six V.C.s Before Breakfast (the others were Capts. R.R. Willis and C. Bromley, Sgts. A. Richards and F.E. Stubbs, and Pvt. W. Kennealy). Grimshaw was acting as a signaler for ‘C’ Company of 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, keeping contact between his unit and the operation’s headquarters on HMS Euryalus. In the course of the fighting Grimshaw’s pack and water bottle were riddled with bullets, and his cap badge was smashed, but he miraculously escaped injury, constantly braving intense machine-gun fire from the Turkish positions to maintain communications. Grimshaw’s citation read: “On the 25th April, 1915, headquarters and three companies of the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by very deadly fire from hidden machine guns, which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained. Amongst the many very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Captain Bromley, Serjeant Stubbs, and Corporal Grimshaw have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most single acts of bravery and devotion to duty.” (The citation for Bromley, Stubbs, and Grimshaw was not issued until March 15, 1917, due to War Office regulations and red tape; the citation for Willis, Richards, and Kennealy, worded identically, had been issued on August 23, 1915.) Grimshaw survived Turkish gunfire only to fall victim to frostbite. He spent five weeks in hospital and then was sent to England to recuperate. In 1917 he was in France when he was commissioned in the field, after which he was posted to India. He rejoined the “Lancs” in 1921, then retired from active duty to become a recruiting officer, a role he filled until his final retirement in 1953 with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel after forty-one years service. He passed away at the age of 87 at his home in the Twickenham area of London. His V.C. medal is privately
We also have a Feature on Colonel John Elisha Grimshaw
V.C.
Click here to go to it


Sgt Frank Edward Stubbs V.C.


Birth: Mar. 12, 1888
Death: Apr. 25, 1915

World War I Victoria Cross Recipient. Born in the Walworth section of London, not much is known of Stubbs’s personal life other than that he enlisted in the Army at a very young age and served with the 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers in India before his World War I service. Sergeant Stubbs was awarded the V.C. for action during the landings at W Beach during the Gallipoli Campaign, April 25, 1915, one of the group known in the press as “The Six V.C.s Before Breakfast” (the others were Capts. R.R. Willis and C. Bromley, Sgts. A. Richards and W. Keneally, and L/Cpl. J.E. Grimshaw). From Stubbs’s citation: “On the 25th April, 1915, headquarters and three companies of the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by very deadly fire from hidden machine guns, which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained. Amongst the many very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Captain Bromley, Serjeant Stubbs, and Corporal Grimshaw have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most single acts of bravery and devotion to duty.” (The citation for Bromley, Stubbs, and Grimshaw was not issued until March 15, 1917, due to War Office regulations and red tape; the citation for Willis, Richards, and Keneally, worded identically, had been issued on August 23, 1915.) Stubbs was awarded the medal for his leadership in getting his men through the wire and up the cliffs. He was killed later in the day making the assault on his company’s the final objective; his body was never recovered. Stubbs’s V.C. medal is on display at the Lancashire Fusiliers


Capt Cuthbert Bromley

Birth: Sep. 19, 1878
Death: Aug. 13, 1915

World War I Victoria Cross Recipient. Bromley was born in Seaford, Sussex, the son of Sir John and Lady Bromley. In school he was reported to be an enthusiastic athlete but an indifferent student, so his original plans to pursue a career in either medicine or the civil service were out. Instead he joined the Army, gaining a commission in the 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers after a stint in the 3rd King’s Liverpool Regiment, a militia unit. He saw service in West Africa and India, where, under his leadership as adjutant the battalion won a number of Army championships in football, boxing, and cross-country running. Bromley was awarded the V.C. for action during the landings at W Beach during the Gallipoli Campaign, April 25, 1915, one of the group known in the press as “The Six V.C.s Before Breakfast (the others were Capt. R.R. Willis; Sgts. A. Richards and F.E. Stubbs; L/Cpl. Grimshaw; and Pvt. W. Kennealy). Bromley’s citation read: “On the 25th April, 1915, headquarters and three companies of the 1st Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers in effecting a landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula to the West of Cape Helles, were met by very deadly fire from hidden machine guns, which caused a great number of casualties. The survivors, however, rushed up to and cut the wire entanglements, notwithstanding the terrific fire from the enemy, and after overcoming supreme difficulties, the cliffs were gained and the position maintained. Amongst the many very gallant officers and men engaged in this most hazardous undertaking, Captain Bromley, Serjeant Stubbs, and Corporal Grimshaw have been selected by their comrades as having performed the most single acts of bravery and devotion to duty.” (The citation for Bromley, Stubbs, and Grimshaw was not issued until March 15, 1917, due to War Office regulations and red tape; the citation for Willis, Richards, and Kennealy, worded identically, had been issued on August 23, 1915.) Bromley injured his back in the action at W Beach but did not seek medical attention until wounded by a bullet in the knee on April 28. He was wounded again while in temporary command of the 1st Battalion (with promotion to Major) during the Battle of Gully Ravine on June 28. This time he was evacuated to Egypt to recover, and in August begged his way aboard the troopship Royal Edward to return to the Gallipoli peninsula. The ship never arrived. It was torpedoed and sunk by the UB-14 on August 13, 1915, with the loss of 866 lives, among them Bromley. His body was never recovered. His V.C. medal is privately held.


A boat carrying Lancashire Fusiliers, bound for Gallipoli.
W Beach, on the other side of Cape Helles from V Beach, was about 350 yards long and 40 yards wide at its widest point.
While it lacked the strong defensive positions provided by the fort and castle at V Beach, it was mined,
had extensive barbed wire entanglements and
the only exit was via a gully that could be easily defended. There were about three platoons of Turks at W Beach. British
accounts say there was at least one machine gun, Turkish accounts say there were none.
The 1st Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers came ashore from 32 cutters. As at V Beach, the defenders held their fire
until the boats were almost to the shore. Unlike V Beach, the Lancashires were able to get ashore and, knowing that to
stay on the exposed beach meant being annihilated, they kept moving forward, despite suffering horrendous losses. The battalion suffered 533 casualties, over half its strength. At 7.15am, about an hour after the landing began, the beach was secured.
With V Beach still closed, the main force began to come ashore at W.
Six Victoria Crosses were awarded at W Beach, which thereafter was known as Lancashire Landing.
The VC recipients were elected by the survivors of the battalion because it was deemed to contain "equally brave and distinguished" men.
W Beach would become the main British base at Helles through the campaign.


2030 Pte John Patrick Collerton


1) a picture of a John P Collerton signed & dated on reverse JPC 9/3/10.

From this I got his initials and that he was in the army as Private.

2) from the internet I found him on the 2-3/April/1911 UKcensus barracked at Andover, Hampshire as a Private in Lancashire Fusiliers aged 20 and single.
see line 10.

3) a postcard (Christmas/New Year celebration of XX LF kept from him by my
Grandmother Kathleen Regan nee Collerton) signed and dated Brother John 4Dec1913 in Karachi, India.


From this I discovered he was a brother in the XX Lancashire Fusiliers and stationed in India which led to 2 above and your website.

4) from the internet a John Patrick Collerton is noted on the Medal Roll for WW1.
but there is no record of him on the Imperial War Museums 1914-18 database.

Furthermore he may have had a father in the LF which led him to joint them.
On my Grandmothers marriage cert. 1933 she wrote father down as Patrick John Collerton. Sergeant Major Lancs Fusiliers (deceased). But this may have been to avoid putting nothing and her brother in a disguised way. We've always understood she was an orphan who also married an orphan so its very difficult tracing beyond them. The 1891, 1901 and 1911 searches only reveal John Collerton in Andover a/a. The BMD registers are a similar blank for DOB.

post discharge portrait dated 11th November, 1917 with SWB and LF cap badges on his jacket lapels
Enlisted: 20th February 1910
Rank: Private
Regimental No.: 2030
Discharged: 20th March 1916 due to wounds received in action. Rank Private.

He was in WWI Dardanelles Campaign in battle at Gallipoli on 25th April 1915 where he was shot in right leg having disembarked a boat on beach. Was on beach 3 days before returned to ship. Lost right foot & leg below knee. Recuperated in Malta, before returning to UK and being discharged with 3 WWI medals & SWB.

He also had medal for service in India c1911-1914, but unsure of these!

sent in by
Kevan Regan
John's was Kevan Great Uncle.


Tommy Farrell (footballer, born 1887)
Thomas "Tommy" Farrell (1887 - 1 July 1916) was an English professional football inside left who played in the Football League for Manchester City. He also played in the Scottish Football League for Airdrieonians.
Personal life
Farrell enlisted as a private in the Lancashire Fusiliers soon after the outbreak of the First World War in 1914.[3] He was posted to the 1st Battalion serving at Gallipoli in July 1915 and was evacuated in January 1916. Now a corporal, Farrell died in the Fusiliers' attack on the Hawthorn Ridge Redoubt on the first day of the Somme.] He was buried in Auchonvillers Military Cemetery.

Rank: Corporal
Service No: 9038
Date of Death: 01/07/1916
Regiment/Service: 1st Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers

Grave Reference:
II. E. 19.
Cemetery:
AUCHONVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY



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Sgt William Wilson
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